Monthly Archives: February 2019


3 Ways to Exercise with Your Baby

3 Ways to Exercise with Your Baby

Let’s looks at ways to exercise with your baby. While infants are often plenty active on their own, physical activity is an important part of any stage of life. If you have an infant in your life, here are some ideas to get both you and baby moving!

Ways to Exercise with Your Baby 1.
Join a Parent-Infant Play Group. Many gyms and community centers offer play groups or form your own! These programs often have leaders trained in child development and can help you keep your baby active safely. Also, these groups are a great way to meet other new parents. You can also look for a parent-baby exercise class, such as baby and me yoga.

Ways to Exercise with Your Baby 2.
Get Outside. Walk or jog with your baby in a stroller, or go for a bike ride with your infant secured in a baby safety seat. The new smells, sounds and views will stimulate your baby’s senses. Keep stroller time limited to no more than 60 minutes and bring a blanket with you. When you are ready to rest, let baby crawl and explore too.

Ways to Exercise with Your Baby 3.
Engage Infants in Active Time. Activity does not have to be complicated. For example, include lively baby games in each day. Hold playtime on the floor, and let your infant explore his or her surroundings. Encourage your baby to move their arms, legs, feet and hands! Play time can also help your baby learn to crawl, roll and walk. Activity also encourages cognitive development, and might set the stage for an active toddler.

Always check with your health care provider about age-appropriate activities. If you are looking for more inspiration, schedule an appointment with KareBoost Health for a free health consultation with Dr. Karen Leibowitz, and see how you can be healthier today!

Karen L. Leibowitz, MD
Health and Medical Coach
KareBoost Health

Processed Foods Part 2: Ways to Stay Healthy

Processed Foods Part 2 Ways to Stay Healthy

A lot of what we eat today is processed foods. Some processed foods have ingredients added, some are fortified with nutrients, and some are packaged to last longer. Even foods labeled natural or organic can be processed. More people are trying to avoid processed foods, and the American Heart Association reports that 50% of consumers have tried to eat fewer processed foods.

Here are 3 tips to keep in mind next time you are at the grocery store.

1. Choose Healthier Processed Foods. Read food labels and look for the American Heart Association Heart-Check mark on packaged foods. Not all processed foods are unhealthy. For example, frozen produce without any added salt or sauce is a healthy, less expensive way to add produce into your diet.

2. Seek Alternatives. Try replacing some of the processed foods in your diet with healthier options. Cook more meals at home, look for less processed options such as frozen fruits and veggies, and add more produce to your diet.

3. Watch out for Sodium. Extensive research has shown that too much sodium is related to high blood pressure. Most of the sodium in our diets comes from highly processed foods, not the salt shaker. Watch out for cold cuts, cured meats, pizza, bread and soup. For example, try cooking simple soups and pasta sauce instead of buying them prepared, to reduce sodium.

Keep these tips in mind next time you are at the grocery store and feel empowered to make better choices! If you are seeking even more ways to keep your family healthy, schedule a free consultation with Dr. Karen today!

Karen L. Leibowitz, MD
Health and Medical Coach
KareBoost Health

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars

Let’s look at strategies for dealing with added sugars. Eating and drinking a lot of added sugar is one likely cause of the obesity epidemic in the U.S. Too much added sugar is linked to increased risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Here are 5 strategies for dealing with added sugars and avoiding sneaky added sugars in your diet.

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars 1.
Know Your Limits. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories a day of added sugar (6 teaspoons) for women and no more than 150 calories a day (9 teaspoons) for most men. A typical 12-ounce can of regular soda has 130 calories and 8 teaspoons of sugar.

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars 2.
Sources. Sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, are the biggest source of added sugar in the American diet. Also look out for baked goods, ice cream and candy.

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars 3.
Replace Sugar. Drink water, sparkling water, unsweetened tea or sugar-free beverages instead. Eat fruit for dessert, and if you buy fruit juice, make sure it is 100% juice with no added sugars.

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars 4.
Find It. Read food labels! Added sugar might appear as honey, molasses, can juice or fruit juice concentrate. Also look for words ending in “ose”- like fructose and dextrose. This usually means added sugar!

Strategies for Dealing with Added Sugars 5.
Make Food Tasty. No one likes bland food, which is partly why it is easy to consume so much sugar. Enhance foods with spices, such as cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger. Added fresh fruit to cereal or oatmeal to replace sugar.

KareBoost Health is here to help. Contact us to find out how our health coaches can help your family be healthier through our FREE Consultation with Dr. Karen Leibowitz.

Karen L. Leibowitz, MD
Health and Medical Coach
KareBoost Health

Ways to Prevent Sports Injuries in Youth

Ways to Prevent Sports Injuries in Youth

Let’s look at ways to prevent sports injuries in youth. While participating in sports can be a great way to teach teamwork, instill discipline, and help kids stay active, all sports come with the risk of injury. Knowing the causes of injury and how to prevent them can be instrumental in keeping your kids safe.

Here are 3 ways to prevent sports injuries while encouraging kids to stay active.

Ways to Prevent Sports Injuries #1.
Use Proper Equipment. It’s very important that children use the proper equipment for the sport they are playing, and that it fits properly. Ask your child’s coach about the appropriate helmets, pads, mouth guards, shoes and other protective equipment. In the United States, the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment sets standards. All equipment that your child is using should meet these standards.

Ways to Prevent Sports Injuries #2.
Adult Supervision. Any team sport that your child is involved in should be properly supervised. Select a team and coach that shares your philosophy of putting safety first, and also make sure the coach is CPR and first aid supervised.

Ways to Prevent Sports Injuries #3.
Proper Preparation. Make sure that your children play sports that adequately match their skill level, emotional and physical maturity, and size. Every good practice and game should include an adequate warm up. Kids should be given plenty of opportunities throughout to drink fluids and rest.

While sports are a great way to keep kids active, keeping these tips in mind will keep your child safe in sports. Never push a child to join a sport they do not enjoy- the best way to foster a love of exercise to find activities your child enjoys. For more ways to keep kids active, consider joining our Kids Yoga Class on the weekends or start working with one of our Health Coaches at KareBoost Health!

Karen L. Leibowitz, MD
Health and Medical Coach
KareBoost Health